January 25

A Minor Pentatonic Scale With Free Jam Track

2  comments


The A minor pentatonic scale is easily the most popular scale to learn for improvising on the guitar.

You’ll learn how to play the basic A minor pentatonic scale step-by-step. And I’ll show you a fun way to practice it so that it becomes natural.

Then you’ll learn a lick you can use with the scale  for improvising.

For even more fun you can download a free jam track to play along with.


Free Jam Track


Play Or Download the Jam Track below.


Free Scale Fingering Diagram 


Download the A Minor Pentatonic Scale Fingering Diagram


Want more help? Improvisation FastTrack 101 is a complete step-by-step 4 Week course that includes instruction videos, jam tracks, and workbooks. It’s just one of many course modules included with your Real Guitar Success membership. Members log in here.

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Tomas Michaud
Latest posts by Tomas Michaud (see all)

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cp scales


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  1. So if this is the 12 bar blues, do I ever adjust what scale I’m using or do I use the A minor Pentatonic through the whole thing? I assume the backing track is playing the A7 for the first 4 measures, then D7 for two, then A7 for two, then E7, D7, A7, E7 (these 7th chords are all minors I guess). Thank you for your video!

    1. HI Phil… Good question. You do play the one scale (A minor pentatonic) throughout the entire progression. It works! Try it out. I am using the A7, D7 and E7 chords. They are not minor, but rather what’s called dominant 7th chords (major with a 7th note added). Go figure 🙂 – Tomas

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